Richard and Robert, DuPont Twins - Andy Warhol

Richard and Robert, DuPont Twins

ANDY WARHOL DUPONT TWINSRichard and Robert Lasko (Photo: Anton Perich)

During the ‘50s through ‘80s, Andy Warhol was known for surrounding himself with an entourage of young, beautiful and eccentric characters in New York City. In the late ‘70s, a pair of fair-haired twins from Connecticut joined his lively and stylish posse. Richard and Robert Lasko, who called themselves the DuPont twins, were only seventeen when they joined the New York Underground. Eventually, they crossed paths with 48-year-old Warhol, who had a liking for twins, and were admitted to his extended entourage.

Adopted at birth, the DuPont twins from Westport, Connecticut grew up in a fast-paced lifestyle experimenting with drugs and sex at a young age. They worked for a caterer named Martha Stewart in 1977. One night after working at a party in Manhattan, an employee brought them to New York’s hot spot, Studio 54. They found a world of excess and changed their name to become pets of cafe society.

In a 2007 article in New York Magazine, the DuPont twins described what it was like to be submerged in the notorious world of sex, drugs and art during Warhol’s era. Reporters for the social magazine Beverly Hills 213, the 47-year-old and sober twins raised controversy due to their experience deemed deviant from the recollections captured in Warhol’s journal, The Andy Warhol Diaries. Richard and Robert account suggested they were more involved in the Factory scene than Warhol had recorded, and they also described many of Warhol’s unusual perversions.

On the nature of Warhol and the twins relationship

The Andy Warhol Diaries: “One of the DuPont twins told Susan Blond that he’s so in love with me. He told her all these nutty things, and I mean, all I do is (laughs) hold his hand and feel him up.” – Andy Warhol

New York Magazine: “When I read that, I was like, No! It was more than that. He would kiss me, and yes he touched me—he would sometimes jerk me off—but I think he did genuinely like me. Brigid Berlin, who was the receptionist and gatekeeper at the Factory, says so.” – Richard “DuPont”

On the twins role in the Factory

The Andy Warhol Diaries: “And the DuPont twins called me at Halston’s, they were calling all over town for me, and I wouldn’t take the call, and then they had the nerve to ring the doorbell and they were drunk and giggling and I went to the front door and told them off.” – Andy Warhol

New York Magazine: “He’d always be trying to get us to help him get commissions for portraits. At Studio, he’d ask, “Can we get one of those rich men you’re sleeping with to buy a portrait?” And later it was more like, “Why don’t you go sleep with that one, and then talk him into getting a portrait.” We did that a lot.” – Richard “DuPont”

On Warhol’s perversions

The Andy Warhol Diaries: no recorded mentions

New York Magazine: “One time I did it for Andy and Dalí together. We were in a black limousine, going uptown on Park Avenue South. Potassa and Dalí’s wife, Gala, were there, too. I don’t know why Andy grabbed me; maybe he was trying to get Dalí turned on, or maybe he just wanted to show that he had control.” – Richard “DuPont”

Based on the provided information, there is no proven truth to either stories. Decades have passed where witnesses cannot bear true testimonies – peers have died and memories have faded. This contentious account enhances the mysterious image the famed pop artist labored to create. Behind the silver wig and dark sunglasses, who was Andy Warhol? Was there a fabricated story to his life with an underlying truth or is what was said what we’re meant to believe?

As said by Richard “DuPont”, “There are things I regret. But at the same time, a lot of the things that make me angry to remember are the things that I enjoyed too. I went along with it all, playing the game and having fun. I was not chewed up and spit out by any of these people—if I didn’t like them, I always could have left.”

Read the entire DuPont interview with New York Magazine.

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