Andy Warhol - Mick Jagger 138
mick jagger by andy warhol
Andy Warhol - Mick Jagger 138
Andy Warhol - Mick Jagger 138
Andy Warhol - Mick Jagger F.S. II 140 hanging jpg
Andy Warhol - Mick Jagger F.S. II 138 sig blur jpg
Andy Warhol Mick Jagger 138

Mick Jagger 138

Catalogue Title: Mick Jagger (FS II.138)

Year: 1975

Size: 43 ½ x 29″ (110.5 x 73.7 cm)

Medium: Screenprint on Arches Aquarelle (Rough) paper

Edition: 250, 50 AP, 3 PP, signed in pencil lower right and numbered in pencil lower left; some signed in felt pen. Most of the prints are also signed in black, green, or red felt pen by Mick Jagger.

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Mick Jagger 138 was created while Warhol was at the height of fame. Warhol spent a lot of time with Jagger and his wife Bianca. He was was closest to their daughter, Jade, whom Andy taught how to paint. He produced this screenprint of Mick Jagger as part of a portfolio of 10 in 1975. Most prints in the series feature Warhol’s signature in pencil as well as Mick Jagger’s signature in felt pen. The Mick Jagger portfolio is distinctive in its collage style; each print emphasizes a different aspect of Jagger’s features.

Mick Jagger 138 by Andy Warhol as Part of his Larger Body of Work

Mick Jagger 138 is one of several pieces that Andy Warhol did depicting Mick Jagger. In 1969, the Rolling Stones approached Warhol and asked him to design the sleeve for their ninth studio album Sticky Fingers. Warhol agreed and received a letter from Mick Jagger that included a polite warning not to make the cover too complex to avoid problems during production. Ignoring Jagger’s warning, Warhol went on to produce an unforgettable cover that featured a close-up shot of actor and Warhol superstar Joe Dallesandros. Additionally, Warhol expanded into the realm of performance art with a traveling multimedia show called The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, which featured The Velvet Underground, a rock band. Warhol also worked with his Superstar performers and various other people to create hundreds of films between 1963 and 1968. These films were scripted and improvised, ranging from conceptual experiments and simple narratives to short portraits and sexploitation features. His works include Empire (1964), The Chelsea Girls (1966), and the Screen Tests (1964-66).

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