Beatles by Andy Warhol
Beatles by Andy Warhol unframed
Detail of the "Estate of Andy Warhol'' and "Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts" ink stamps on verso
Detail of the "Estate of Andy Warhol'' and "Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts" ink stamps on verso
Bealtes by Andy Warhol in the frame
Size comparison image showing the size of the Beatles(FS IIIB.5A) relative to the height of Warhol and Edie Sedgwick.
Andy Warhol Kissing John Lennon, 1978. Photo by Christopher Makos.

Beatles B5A

Catalog Title: Beatles (FS IIIB.5A)
Year: 1980
Size: 31 7/8 x 40 in | 81.2 x 101.8 cm
Medium: Mohawk Superfine wove mounted on Lenox Museum board
Edition: Unique. Stamped with the "Estate of Andy Warhol'' and "Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts" ink stamps on verso.
Hidden

Beatles by Andy Warhol was created in 1980 and is a striking example of Warhol’s iconic use of pop art techniques to depict cultural figures. The piece features the four members of the Beatles, each rendered in a vibrant, flat color scheme that is typical of Warhol’s style.

Warhol’s choice of colors—magenta and pink—gives the artwork a bold, eye-catching look that plays with the conventions of celebrity portraiture. The use of non-naturalistic colors and the repetition of the figure style are hallmarks of Warhol’s approach to pop art, emphasizing the mass-produced, commodified nature of celebrity images.

The simplicity of the composition and the uniformity of the style across all four portraits create a sense of cohesion, despite each figure being individually stylized. This method underscores the collective identity of the Beatles as a globe-trotting band, rather than four separate individuals.

In terms of symbolism, Warhol’s use of color and form can be understood as a commentary on the public and media’s consumption of celebrity images. The bright, almost commercial colors suggest the commodification of celebrity status, while the stylized and simplified rendering reflects the way media distills complex human figures into easily recognizable and consumable icons.

This artwork not only captures the visual aesthetic typical of Warhol but also engages with deeper themes of fame, media representation, and the artifice inherent in the celebrity culture, which were recurring subjects in his work.

Photo Credit: Andy Warhol Kissing John Lennon, 1978. Photo by Christopher Makos.

 

Share this page:

Related Works