Andy Warhol - Mother and Child F.S. II 383 jpg
Andy Warhol - Mother and Child F.S. II 383 jpg
Andy Warhol - Mother and Child F.S. II 383 jpg
Andy Warhol - Mother and Child F.S. II 383 hanging jpg
Andy Warhol - Mother and Child F.S. II 383 Signature jpg
Andy Warhol Mother and child 383

Mother and Child 383

Catalogue Title: Mother and Child (FS II.383)

Year: 1986

Size: 36″ x 36″

Medium: Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board.

Edition: Edition of 250, 50 AP, 15 PP, 15 HC, 10 numbered in Roman numerals, signed and numbered in pencil. Portfolio of 10.

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Mother and Child 383 by Andy Warhol is a screenprint from his Cowboys and Indians series. In this series, Warhol explores the Old West as an All-American collective history. Pursuing his fascination with the dichotomy between appearance and reality, Warhol’s work is a commentary on mass media and the way in which contrived imagery can affect how a society understands and perceives its history.

Mother and Child 383 by Andy Warhol as Part of His Larger Body of Work

The Cowboys and Indians series is exemplary of how Warhol utilized heavily embedded images derived from popular culture. Images like Mother and Child 383 represents tokens of native culture, whereas figures like Geronimo and Annie Oakley are based on characters in the Hollywood adaptation of American history, which do not truly represent the roles that these individuals historically played. Rather than portraying Native Americans within their historical landscape, or Cowboys in their veritable forms, Warhol chose to portray a popular, romanticized version of the American West. The West that he chose to represent is familiar to everyone and can be seen in novels, films and TV series. Warhol’s Cowboys and Indians series is an ahistorical representation that mirrors a popular interpretation of the American West.

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